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  • Vanadium

    Vanadium is one of the transition metals on the periodic table, rarely existing naturally in its native state. Vanadium can often be found in deposits of coal, petroleum and phosphate rock and can also be found in a combined state in nearly 65 different minerals including Magnetite, Vanadinite, Carnotite and Patronite.

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  • Meet the Goodfellow Team: Peter Barnes

    Our team is the beating heart of the company. Every employee brings something unique to the table and makes their own impact on Goodfellow’s overall success. Our Meet the Team series shines a light on our individuals, celebrating what they do for the company and who they are outside the business. This week, we’re speaking to Peter Barnes.

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  • Vitreous Carbon

    Vitreous Carbon, otherwise known as “Glassy Carbon”, is a non-graphitising carbon and comes in many forms. In fact, Carbon can take on so many different appearances, properties or morphologies, you might go as far as to say it’s something of a shapeshifter. So, apart from its shifter superpower, what else do we know about it?

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  • A focus on sustainability: Green Graphene

    By now, most of us are familiar with Graphene, the wonder material discovered at the University of Manchester back in 2004. For those who need a reminder, Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a two-dimensional nanostructure. It’s the first one-atom thick 2D material ever discovered, yet it’s one of the strongest materials in the world.

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  • Are composites complicated?

    A composite is a material made from two or more constituent materials that have significantly varying physical or chemical properties. Simply put, composites are a combination of components. The purpose of composites is to create something stronger/better as a team, rather than individual players.

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  • What is Silicon when it’s not in the valley?

    What makes up 27.7% of the Earth’s crust and is one of the most useful elements known to mankind? The answer is Silicon! Not much of a punchline, but some solid facts about today’s material focus, Silicon. This material is also the second most abundant element on our planet, coming second only to Oxygen, and is crucial to many industries.

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  • Green Production Range: Cellulose Acetate Film

    Goodfellow’s Green Production Range is dedicated to using environmentally sound products and processes that conserve energy and the natural resources of our planet. We believe in fuelling innovation whilst fostering sustainability and so created a range of products that do just that. By using green materials, you can help to reduce the impact that non-renewable materials have on the environment.

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  • Synthetic Sapphires: by popular demand

    Last week on the Goodfellow blog, we took a spotlight to Alumina. In this post, we mentioned that this material goes into the making of synthetic Sapphires and Rubies. This week, as requested by some of our readers, we’re going to take a closer look. So, take this edition as a “you asked we answered”… As Ruby exhibits identical properties to those of Sapphire, we’re going to focus on Sapphire today.

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  • Throwback Thursday: The History of Nanotechnology

    Sometimes, the best things come in the smallest packages, so the saying goes. Today’s Throwback Thursday is going to prove this statement true by shining a light on nanotechnology. Although nanotechnology has a small history, spanning a little way back on humanity’s timeline (puns intended), it’s still had a major impact. Got a little time? We’ll stop with the puns. Let’s learn more…

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  • All About Alumina

    Otherwise known as Aluminium Oxide, Alumina is a white, nearly colourless crystalline substance. It’s produced by refining Bauxite, an ore mined from topsoil in certain tropical and subtropical regions.

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  • Spotlight on Polycarbonate

    Without realising it, you’ve probably used a product with Polycarbonate in it today. You almost definitely will have used one in your lifetime! Polycarbonate (PC) is practically everywhere, used in multiple applications. It’s a naturally transparent amorphous thermoplastic with many desirable qualities and a unique combination of properties that make it a popular choice.

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  • Throwback Thursday: The Discovery of Penicillin

    It can be said that the discovery of antibiotics was a real turning point in human history. For the first time, doctors could stop deadly infectious diseases in their tracks! This edition of Throwback Thursday takes a look at not just any antibiotic, but the original antibiotic. That’s right, we’re learning all about penicillin! Let’s find out more…

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  • An insight into Indium

    Discovered in 1863 by German chemists Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymous Richter, Indium is an element on the periodic table. The name comes from the Latin ‘indicum’, which means violet or indigo. In nature, it’s quite rare and often found as a trace element in Zinc, Lead, Iron and Copper Sulfide ores.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Artificial Intelligence - the full account

    The concept of artificial intelligence (AI) can technically be traced back as far as the 1300s, although the idea wouldn’t be brought to life for centuries still. On this week’s special extended edition of Throwback Thursday, we’re looking at the history of artificial intelligence and what took it from a theoretical framework to something fully embedded into modern society. Intrigued? Wanting to learn more? Let’s get started…

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  • Throwback Thursday: Teflon

    From cookware to electronics, Teflon is a widely used synthetic polymer that most of us have contact with every day. It’s a fluoropolymer of tetrafluoroethylene and arguably the most famous fluoropolymer there is! The material, which is actually called Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), is most commonly known by its brand name, Teflon. So, where exactly did this wonder material come from and how did it come to be synonymous with its brand name? Let’s find out more…

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  • Polyethylene Terephthalate

    Today we’re looking at the most common thermoplastic polyester, Polyethylene Terephthalate…

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  • Throwback Thursday: The International Space Station

    The second brightest object in our sky, a home from home and the largest object mankind has ever put into space! This week’s Throwback Thursday is all about the International Space Station (ISS)! Locked in Earth’s orbit, the ISS is a multi-nation construction project and is a hub for astronaut research. Time to find out more about this off-world landmark (skymark?!) ...

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  • The Varying Forms of Boron Nitride

    Boron Nitride, or BN, is not as “famous” and has less visibility than other simple inorganic compounds, such as Sodium Chloride or Aluminium Nitride. Often used in high-temperature applications due to good thermal and chemical stability, Boron Nitride also has an exciting future within nanotechnology.

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  • Throwback Thursday: The History of Refrigeration

    During the summer months, refrigeration is probably on our minds more than ever. Workers in offices everywhere often pass their colleagues with throw-away comments such as “It’s a hot one today!” or “I wish I could sit in the fridge!”. This classic summertime statement may lead you to wonder where we would be without our trusty refrigerator, or even where it all began… This week’s heatwave-inspired Throwback Thursday will answer those questions! Today we’re looking at the history of the fridge, so let’s find out more…

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  • Zinc

    The word ‘Zinc’ actually comes from the German word “Zinn”, which means Tin. It’s a bluish-white, brittle metal that has been known to mankind for millennia and is the fourth most common metal in use today, after Iron, Aluminium and Copper.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Edition: X-ray

    Welcome to Throwback Thursday! Today we’re going to be looking at a technology, which today, we rarely lend a second thought to. This technology was discovered accidentally, but without it, our lives would be much more complicated. This week our throwback star is X-ray, so let’s find out more…

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  • Platinum Mesh

    Archaeologists cite the era of the ancient Egyptians as the time in which Platinum was first integrated into human life. In fact, the earliest evidence of Platinum dates back almost three thousand years to the famous Casket of Thebes, which was adorned with the precious metal.

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  • Throwback Thursday: manufacturing edition: Janssen’s Microscope

    Welcome to this week’s edition of Throwback Thursday, where we’re going to be taking an up-close look at an important invention that really magnified our lives. If you haven’t already guessed by the puns, this week we are going to be learning about the first microscope! Let’s take a closer look (that’s the last pun, we promise)…

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  • Aluminium Foil

    Aluminium foil can be found in kitchen drawers and cabinets in many homes. Originally, it came as a replacement for Tin foil after World War II; not only was it cheaper and more durable, it also helped to avoid the slight ‘tin taste’ of food that was wrapped in Tin foil.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Edition: The Noble Quest

    Despite the title of this article, today we aren’t going to be learning about knights, horses, kings and treasure. Today we’re looking at the Noble Gases. Welcome to the new edition of Throwback Thursday (science edition)! Whether you’re already acquainted with the Nobles or this is your first encounter (perhaps you studied them in school but have since forgotten), together let’s start our learning quest!

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  • Polymers: The Goodfellow Performance Pyramid

    It is highly likely that we have all heard of polymers, but what do we actually know about them? To start with, polymers are described as materials made up of long, repeating chains of large molecules, or macromolecules, but this is just the beginning. The number of available polymers is huge and the applications for these products can be many and varied, with materials being suitable for specific operations such as operating temperature range, wear resistance and environmental degradation.

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  • Tungsten Wire

    Tungsten metal, also known as Wolfram, was first isolated back in 1783 by J.J. and F. Ehuijar in Vergara, Sweden. The metal itself is quite rare, found exclusively in the Earth’s crust bound within ores and other chemical compounds. Tungsten metal is lustrous and silvery-white in colour, found in the ore Wolframite, an iron manganese tungstate mineral.

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  • Polyimide Film

    Polyimide Film is an innovative material which sits on the high-performance end of the polymer spectrum. Possessing a unique combination of properties allows it to be used in a wide range of applications, which leads us to this article, as there’s a lot we can talk about. If you don’t know much about Polyimide Film (no judgement), don’t worry, you’re about to find out more!

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Edition: Carbonated Water

    Sparkling water, fizzy water, carbonated water – call it what you will, this is a beverage that splits opinions in today’s society! Welcome to this week’s Throwback Thursday, where we will be looking into carbonated water, who invented it and how it came to be. Whether it’s a delicious, refreshing beverage or something that tastes like TV static to you, it’s still an interesting journey. Let’s find out more…

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  • Technical glass applications

    Glass is almost everywhere we look; the outside world is literally covered in glass (if you look at it through your window). There are two main defining characteristics of glass. First, it’s an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid, which means there isn’t a long-range order in the positioning of its molecules. The second characteristic is that glass exhibits a reversible transition from a hard and brittle state to a molten state. When it’s heated and this happens, there is no pronounced change in the material structure. These characteristics form the basis of innovative glass solutions to high-tech challenges.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science edition: The history of fingerprinting

    It’s a well-known fact that, like snowflakes, the fingerprints of no two individuals are the same. The ancient Babylonians were creative with this knowledge. They would press the tips of their fingers into clay to record a business transaction. Although this ancient equivalent of digital fingerprint recognition is intriguing, we’re going to be looking at a process that’s more closely related to criminology – more specifically, how fingerprints changed the way we identify criminals. The origin of the method may just date further back than you think! Let’s find out more…

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science edition: Who brought the spark?

    Welcome to this week’s edition of our blog series, Throwback Thursday! It goes without saying, electricity is something the modern world takes for granted. So, who do we have to thank for bringing us the spark…? Who invented electricity?! Let’s find out…

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  • Nanomaterials in the Automotive Industry

    The need for better efficiency, cleaner outputs and ways to conserve energy weigh heavy above our heads, but where do nanomaterials play into this?

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  • Poly L Lactic Acid Biopolymer

    Changing the way we think about the world and the way we protect it is more important than ever. The materials we use are arguably the foundations of a greener and healthier world; from clothing materials to scientific and architectural materials, each is as important as the other. Goodfellow are proud supporters of the efforts contributing towards a greener planet.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Manufacturing Edition: T for Torpedo

    On this week’s Throwback Thursday, we’re looking at the very first torpedo, the range weapon used in the defence sector.

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  • Throwback Thursday: manufacturing edition: Getting your motor running

    The theory behind the production of mechanical force from interactions of electricity and magnetic fields was realised by Andre-Marie Ampere in 1820. However, it took the ingenuity of Michael Faraday to make the theory a reality in 1821.

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  • Let’s learn more about Nickel Foam

    Nickel is a versatile metal that is ferromagnetic, corrosion resistant, and even found in cans of baked beans! While we’ve already covered the metal form in our blog (you can catch up here), this article is going to be taking a look at element symbol Ni, atomic number 28’s relative, Nickel Foam.

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  • Zirconia

    Zirconia is used in crowns (in teeth, not the headwear) and specifically the cubic crystal structure, as called cubic Zirconia, is known as a substitute for Diamonds! Although these are common uses, Zirconia is much more than a substitute and shouldn’t be pigeonholed. Zirconia is actually a ceramic, and it has some surprising characteristics.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Manufacturing Edition: 3D Printing

    The first 3D printer ever created was made in 1983 by Chuck Hull. Since then, it has taken the nation by storm. He was the first person to invent the SLA machine (3D printer). This was the first ever device of its kind to print a real physical part from a digital (computer generated) file. Hull later went on to co-found DTM Inc., which 3D Systems Corporation later acquired.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Edition: Genome Editing

    Welcome to today’s Throwback Thursday, where we’re going to be looking at how two female scientists pioneered a revolutionary gene-editing technology and won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for it! A good way to round up Women’s History Month, don’t you think? Let’s find out more…

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  • Welcome to the Materials Hub

    Goodfellow’s Materials Hub is a place where designers and artists come to explore, evaluate, and share information with their fellow professionals, near and far. The purpose of the Hub is to be an ever-expanding, one-stop source of knowledge and inspiration for your next innovation!

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  • Throwback Thursday: Manufacturing Edition: Mass-Producing Stainless Steel

    In 1913, Harry Brearley discovered a means of mass-producing martensitic Stainless Steel.Brearley made this discovery while trying to solve the problem of eroding internal surfaces of gun barrels for the British army during the onset of the First World War.

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  • Fact File: Everything you need to know about Carbon Nanotubes

    When you look at Nanotubes with the naked eye, don’t expect to see tubes. Instead, you will see a material which looks more like a powder. This is because Nanotubes are miniscule!

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Edition: Battling Polio

    Polio was a disease that sickened and killed many children. Jonas Salk was credited with finally developing the first effective vaccine in 1953. The trial results were the first to demonstrate that the polio virus could be grown in skin, muscle, connective tissue and intestinal cells to levels close to what could be grown in nerve cells. This breakthrough allowed Jonas Salk to grow large amounts of the polio virus in order to develop the world-changing vaccine!

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  • A spotlight on light guides: where is the AMS-02 now?

    On 16th May 2011, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), a state-of-the-art particle physics detector, was launched into space. So far, the AMS-02 has been on the International Space Station for over 3,500 days! Our latest blog post reviews the AMS-02’s mission and how it’s been getting along over the past decade…

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  • Silver Linings

    Silver has been around for a lot longer than most things; in fact, Silver objects have been discovered that date back as far as 4,000 BC. It was the first metal to be used as currency, and probably through no coincidence, the words ‘Silver’ and ‘money’ are both the same in over 14 languages.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Manufacturing Edition: The Reflecting Telescope

    Today’s Throwback Thursday is going way back into history. We’re going to take a look at a revolutionary piece of manufacturing, which was crafted by one of the great astronomers and mathematicians of all time, Sir Isaac Newton himself. His invention, the reflecting telescope, changed the field of astronomy forever! Let’s find out why…

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  • Metal’s Allies: Metal Alloys

    Metal alloys are everywhere, whether you realise it or not. The chances are that you will encounter metal alloys in your day-to-day life in the form of tools, jewellery, and cookware. In fact, most metals available on the market are alloys, but why? Read on to find out!

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Edition: Roger Penrose’s black holes and Einstein’s theory of relativity

    On today’s Throwback Thursday, you can expect to read about Einstein’s theory of relativity, mathematician Roger Penrose, and a better-late-than-never Nobel Prize! Sound good? Let’s find out more…

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  • The need for Nickel Knowledge

    Maybe you know Nickel better as the symbol Ni or the atomic number 28 … or perhaps you don’t. The material has an interesting past, from being regarded as a kind of Silver by the natives of Peru, to being mistaken as a prank from a mischievous demon in German mythology during 17thcentury Europe.

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  • Throwback Thursday: Science Innovation Edition: Discovery of DNA

    On today’s Throwback Thursday, we are looking into DNA and who discovered it!

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  • Meet the Goodfellow Team: Joel Aleixo

    The people of Goodfellow are the heart and soul of the company. Every individual makes a unique impact on daily operations of the business and our overall success. So far in our series, we have spoken to members of the team and found out about their role, expertise, and thoughts on scientific innovation. Today, we speak to Joel Aleixo!

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  • Graphene Foam Put to Use

    Graphene is known as a ‘wonder material’, thanks to its ultra-lightweight, 2D status. Its unique properties can be applied to foam, making it useful for a range of applications. In this post, we take a look at Graphene foam put to use!

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  • The future of 3D printing

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has gained traction as an exciting, innovative technology over the last few years. But what exactly is it? And what materials are needed in the process?

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  • Our top Ceramic Carbides

    Ceramic Carbides are the tough guys of the material world. They are among the world’s hardest known materials and are used in a variety of demanding industrial applications, from blasting-equipment nozzles to space-based mirrors. But there is more to these “tough guys” than hardness alone—they have a profile of properties that are valued in a wide range of applications and are worthy of consideration for new research and product design projects. Here, we take a look at their advantages and uses.

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  • Meet the Goodfellow team: Claire Mills

    Goodfellow’s team sits at the heart of the company. Each individual employee has a big impact on the company’s day-to-day operations and overall success.In our series of meet-the-team blog posts, we speak to one member of the team about their role, expertise and opinions on scientific innovation. Today, we’re speaking to Claire Mills.

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  • THE HIGHS (not lows) of 2020

    There’s no doubt that this year has been both difficult and unpredictable. As we were preparing for year end in 2019, it’s safe to say that nobody could have predicted the events that were about to unfold over the next 12 months.That being said, there have nonetheless been highlights and moments of hope and humanity throughout this year. Here we take a look at a few of them from across the scientific and materials R&D communities.

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  • Gold – holding its own against frankincense and myrrh

    What is the enduring appeal of Gold, both for consumers, the financial markets and industrial manufacturers?

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  • Going above and beyond: materials needed for space applications

    Here at Goodfellow, we know that each and every industry we work with is exciting and innovative, but there’s no argument that it is space travel that has captured the imagination of so many people around the world.

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  • Meet the Goodfellow Team: Ron Clawson

    Goodfellow’s team sits at the heart of the company. Each individual employee has a big impact on the company’s day-to-day operations and overall success.In our series of meet-the-team blog posts, we speak to one member of the team about their role, expertise and opinions on scientific innovation. Today, we’re speaking to Ron Clawson.

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  • Top 4 metals for high-tech nuts and bolts

    Fasteners such as nuts, bolts and washers are among the most familiar construction items used around the world, whether as part of everyday furniture construction or in more complex activities such as automotive engineering. Here, we take a look at refractory metals and the benefits they provide for complex or highly technical applications.

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  • Our Top Five 2D Single Crystals for R&D

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials - single-layer materials that consist of just one layer of atoms - have a wide range of uses in materials research and development. It is the size of such materials that affects how they behave, and therefore, their properties. In this post, we take a look at single crystals that are available to help R&D professionals create their own 2D materials.

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  • Meet the Goodfellow Team: Dr. Aphrodite Tomou

    Goodfellow’s team sits at the heart of the company. Each individual employee has a big impact on the company’s day-to-day operations and overall success. In our series of meet-the-team blog posts, we speak to one member of the team about his or her role, expertise and opinions on scientific innovation. Today, we’re speaking to Dr Aphrodite Tomou.

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  • What are the advantages of High-Density Calcium Silicate in industry?

    Industrial facilities operating high-temperature applications have come to trust High-Density Calcium Silicate sheets and rods for insulation – and with good reason.

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  • What are the top ways of using Graphene?

    Graphene is probably one of the most celebrated scientific discoveries to earn the description of “wonder material”.

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  • What are Perovskites used for?

    Perovskites are at the “forefront of materials research” because of their wide range of potential applications including solar cells, LED lights, display screens, memory devices (RAM), lasers and photodetectors.

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  • The best ways to work with reticulated foams

    Reticulated foams – either metal, ceramic or polymer– are high-performance materials well suited to high-tech applications involving heating and cooling.

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  • Your questions answered: Li-ion batteries

    In this blog post, we answer common questions about Li-ion batteries, including what they are, why they’re so useful and the materials used to create them.

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  • How to learn and memorise the Periodic Table

    The Periodic Table is still as important today as it was when it was first created in 1869.Whether you’re a student, researcher, teacher or just have a general interest in science, understanding how the table works, even memorising certain elements of it, can be beneficial. Here, we’re providing tips and tricks on how to do just that.

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  • How to bridge the gap between R&D and engineering

    It’s important that any great material and application designs are implemented into the real-world environment to ensure everyone can benefit from such innovations. However, many scientists and researchers struggle to get a materials concept to move beyond the R&D stage and into the marketplace.

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  • Three surprising facts about Silver

    Silver is, undoubtedly, one of the most well-known precious metals in the world. While widely recognised as a base material in the production of jewellery and design, it’s also used in many scientific applications, such as the production of medical equipment and sputtering targets.

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  • A quick guide to PLA for 3D printing

    PLA is a polyester that has a wide variety of uses. In recent years, its properties such as heat resistance and workability have seen it widely used as an innovative material in 3D printing.

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  • Our top five sustainable materials

    Sustainability, reducing carbon footprints and boosting green credentials: this is something that’s on the cards for individuals and companies alike all around the world. Even when it comes to materials in science and industry, there’s a definitive focus on reducing negative impact on the environment, ultimately creating a more sustainable future for ourselves and generations to come.

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  • The new normal: how the materials science industry is responding to life during a pandemic

    Since early 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic has been making significant changes to life on a global scale. From a huge increase in working from home to operational implications across science and industry, materials science has certainly not escaped this widespread impact.

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  • Development of the Periodic Table

    Today we’re going right back to the basics, focusing on the history and development of the Periodic Table. So, whether you’re currently studying the periodic elements, or you’re an established scientist wanting to learn more about its background, read on for more information!

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  • Welcome to the Goodfellow blog

    Here at Goodfellow, we know just how useful our material and technical expertise can be. Sharing knowledge and advice is a big part of what we do for our customers and wider audiences alike.

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